THE DRESSMAKER

Reviewed by GREG KING Director: Jocelyn Moorhouse Stars: Kate Winslet, Liam Hemsworth, Judy Davis, Hugo Weaving, Sarah Snook, Shane Jacobson, Shane Bourne, Kerry Fox, Caroline Goodall, Rebecca Gibney, Barry Otto, Gyton Grantley, James MacKay, Genevieve Picot, Julia Blake, Terry Norris, Sacha Horler, Alison Whyte, Mark Leonard Winter. "I'm back, you bastards." With those words, Myrtle "Tilly" Dunnage (Kate Winslet) steps off a bus and returns to her home town of Dungatar, a small town situated in the middle of nowhere. Twenty five years ago she was driven out of town Continue reading

ONE EYED GIRL

Reviewed by GREG KING Director: Nick Matthews Stars: Mark Leonard Winter, Steve Le Marquand, Tilda Cobham-Hervey, Craig Behanna. Psychiatry and religion are two crutches that people turn to in times of trouble, seeking help, spiritual guidance and comfort. But these twin sources of help are also double-edged swords and have often been exploited for darker purposes. With religion, the dark side is often the suicide cults with their brainwashing, manipulation and the ability of charismatic leaders to pray on the vulnerable and the troubled. This new low budget Continue reading

ONE-EYED GIRL – interview with director Nick Matthews

by GREG KING Nick Matthews' critically acclaimed dark psychological thriller One-Eyed Girl will have its Melbourne premiere screening Thursday April 23 at 7pm at the Classic Cinema. Having won the Austin Film Festival's prestigious Dark Matters Best Picture Award, Nick Matthews debut film features first rate performances by Mark Leonard Winter (Healing) and Tilda Cobham-Hervey (52 Tuesdays). A Q&A with the director Nick Matthews, producer David Ngo, and actors Craig Behenna and Mark Leonard Winter will follow the screening. To learn more about the film, Greg Continue reading

BLAME

Reviewed by GREG KING Director: Michael Henry Stars: Damian de Montemas, Sophie Lowe, Simon Stone, Mark Leonard Winter, Kestie Morassi, Ashley Zuckerman. Blame is another strong local production that should appeal to audiences who love tense dramas. This taut new Australian film is a variation of the home invasion thriller, in the vein of Funny Games, Death And The Maiden and The Strangers, etc, but it lacks the rather nasty, relentlessly sadistic edge of Michael Haneke’s film. It begins strongly when a group of strangers, dressed in black and wearing Continue reading